Tying Davie McPhail's Transformer Midge

The midges are coming! Looking for a versatile midge pattern? Then look no further than this Transformer Midge from expert fly tyer Davie McPhail. If you only have room in your fly box for one more fly this weekend, then make it this one!

Picture copyright © Davie McPhail, you-tube
Estimated reading time 2 - 2 minutes

The hawthorn flies will start to put in an appearance round our way soon and looking for a matching pattern to try out, I stumbled upon this versatile little number by Davie McPhail.

Davie has designed it to be imitative of a hawthorn fly, gnat or any of the larger adult midges you find in Spring, making it a very adaptable little fly to have with you from April onwards. 

Here Davie uses CDC feathers to create the fly's wings, however he advises adding crystal flash if you want a more hawthorn imitative pattern, to represent the fly's glass like wings. The peacock hurl and grizzle hackle making up the front part of the fly are designed to be especially representative of a gnat.

It's a fairly straightforward fly to tie if you are new to fly tying and Davie's videos are great for beginners as he always gives you loads of tips and advice as he goes along.

Here he demonstrates how to get a fan spread when attaching the CDC feathers to make the wings look more life-like. And a great tip is to wind your peacock herl over a base of superglue to make the fly stronger and last longer.

Hook: Kamasan B160 size 14
Thread: Uni-8/0 black
Body: Small or micro black chenille
Legs: Pre-knotted black pheasant tail
Wing: Natural CDC feathers
Thorax: Dyed black peacock herl
Hackle: Grizzle cock

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