Simms Retractor review

The Simms Retractor lets you keep your nippers or forceps within easy reach by attaching them to your fly fishing vest or Simms Headwaters Chest Pack.

Simms Retractor review
© Fly&Lure
Simms Retractor review
Picture copyright © Fly&Lure
Simms Retractor review
Estimated reading time 2 - 4 minutes

What is the Simms Retractor for?

The Simms Retractor attaches to the outside of your fly fishing vest or chest pack and allows you to attach a pair of forceps or nippers so they are always within reach.

Your tools remain attached to the Simms Retractor via a springy cord so you can't drop them in the water and lose them. The cleverly designed Simms Guide Jacket has a pair integrated into the bottom of its pockets!

How does the Simms Retractor work?

The Simms Retractor consists of a plastic tube about 3-4" long with a robust locking safety pin on the back. You pin the Retractor to your fly fishing vest or the special leathery patches on your Simms Headwaters Chest Pack and lock the pin in place from the other side.

The inside of the tube includes a tightly coiled plastic spring cord with a clip on the other end. You simply attach your nippers or forceps to the clip and they'll remain permanently attached.

The clip on the Simms Retractor is a repurposed lure clip. It's strong and provides a secure connection to your tools and is dead easy to open, should you need to open it again.

How do you use yours?

I've got a pair of Simms Retractors, one on each side of my Simms Headwaters Chest Pack. One has a pair of Hardy Scissor Pliers attached, the other is attached to a Hardy Combo Tool.

They work well and the fixings on the Chest Pack feel secure, so hopefully they'll never fall off. The attached tools do jangle around a bit - it's a shame that Simms don't provide a Retractor with a little holster to hold the nippers or forceps to prevent this.

How long is the cord?

I'm not sure how far the core will extend: It's fairly stretchy and springy but I've never really needed to pull it that far as when using the nippers you're normally doing things at chest level anyway.

When unhooking fish you generally bend down, so again it's not really that important for them to stretch a huge distance.

How much are they and would you buy them again?

I paid £8.99 each for my Simms Retractors. That's quite a bit, I guess, but it's comparable to the price of the similar looking FishPond Retractor. Although they feel a little bit plasticky, they'll hopefully last a long time.

About the author

matt

Comments

No comments yet. Go on, be the first to comment...

Orvis Hydros HD Bank Shot fly line review The Orvis Hydros HD Bank Shot fly line lets you cast good distances with less effort...

Orvis Encounter Waders review Orvis Encounter Waders may be the cheapest in the Orvis range, but they're superb...

Wychwood Competition Drogue and Clamps review The Wychwood Competition Drogue and Clamps kit meets international rules standards and...

Orvis SuperStrong Plus Tippet review Orvis SuperStrong Plus Tippet is a thin, supple, strong and reliable tippet which works...

Airflo Tightlines TLD Elite Boat Seat review The Airflo Tightlines TLD Elite Boat Seat is one of the most widely used in the UK and...

Barrio Line Care fly line dressing review Barrio Line Care fly line dressing is a silicone-based fly line cleaner which makes...

Snowbee Onyx Cassette fly reel review The Snowbee Onyx Cassette fly reel is made from machined die-cast aluminium and is well...

Riverge Grand Max fluorocarbon review Riverge Grand Max fluorocarbon is regarded as one of the highest quality tippet...

Royal Wulff Monoclear Triangle Taper clear intermediate fly line review Royal Wulff's Monoclear clear intermediate fly line uses Lee Wulff's famous Triangle...