Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves review

Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves are very comfortable to wear, but they could be warmer and they could be drier.

Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves review
Picture copyright © Fly and Lure
Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves review
Picture copyright © Fly and Lure
Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves review
Estimated reading time 2 - 4 minutes

How comfortable are these gloves?

The Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves are really comfortable to wear. They fit well, have a bit of stretch to the fabric and the cuff is a good size which keeps your wrist a bit warmer.

What are Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves made from?

These windproof, waterproof gloves are made from breathable Merino wool. The inside is lined with a rubbery-plastic material which is supposed to make them waterproof, while the outside has extra grip so they don't slip when wet.

What's the grip like?

There are lots of tiny raised plastic bumps on the palm of the glove, which do give a bit of extra purchase. You can hold a rod comfortably and always be confident you'll have a firm grip.

What are they like for fishing?

I used the Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves as my main fishing gloves last winter, which was a spectacularly cold and snowy one in the UK. I fished in them a couple of times a week throughout the winter, so they got many hours of use. They were better than wearing no gloves, but they didn't live up to the reputation I was led to believe Sealskinz gloves had.

How warm are Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves?

There lies the first issue: they're actually not particularly warm - at least to me, but I do feel the cold a bit. Granted, they're not rated as a glove to use in arctic conditions, but I didn't find them that warm even when the temperature was only hovering around zero.

I ended up buying some Sealskinz Merino wool glove liners to try and improve the warmth they provided, but that just made them a pain to take on and off. When that failed to do the trick, I just ended up putting a pair of fleece gloves on over the top.

How do they cope with moisture?

Here's the second issue: they're not really that waterproof either. The wool gets soggy and feels cold for a long time, and the waterproof lining of the gloves really isn't up to much. Mine were letting in moisture pretty quickly and I really wouldn't recommend wearing them if you're putting your hands in and out of the water netting fish. The cuff in particular isn't waterproof, so if it gets wet, cold water will trickle inside your glove and make your hands cold.

So they're not particularly dry or waterproof?

In short, no. My Sealskinz Ultra Grip Waterproof Gloves haven't kept my hands that warm and they haven't kept them particularly dry. But they are gloves, and my hands are warmer and drier than they would be without them.

I still wear them when it's not too cold, and when it's not wet, but this season I'm trying out a better looking option - the Patagonia R1 Gloves. I've done a few trips wearing these and they seem to be both actually waterproof and quite warm too.

Available from: Amazon

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matt

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