Barrio GT125 fly line review

The Barrio GT125 is an extra long version of Barrio's popular GT90 fly line and is ideal for those who find a 90 foot line too short. It's probably one of the most widely used fly lines on the distance fly casting scene.

Barrio GT125 fly line review
© Fly and Lure
Barrio GT125 fly line review
Picture copyright © Fly and Lure
Barrio GT125 fly line review
Barrio Fly lines Estimated reading time 4 - 6 minutes

What is the Barrio GT125 fly line designed for?

The Barrio GT125 fly line is effectively a longer version of Barrio's excellent GT90 fly line. While the Barrio GT90 is the standard 90 feet long (27.4m), the GT125 measures a massive 125 feet (38m). Most normal fly fishers don't need a fly line 125 feet long, but for distance competition fly casters a 90-foot line is going to be restrictive.

Most competition casters hit over 90 feet with relative ease, so with a standard line they'd be losing distance as the backing knot shoots up through the rings towards the end of their cast. As a result, you'll find many tournament fly casters using one of these specialist extra long fly lines instead of a standard 90-foot line.

Along with the Scientific Anglers Mastery Expert Distance (or MED) the GT125 is the standard line used by most distance competition fly casters.

What taper does the GT125 use?

According to the line's developer, Mike Barrio, the GT125 (previously known as the GT125 Sport) has a relatively short belly and front taper and a long, finely balanced 73-74 foot head section. This is backed up by a lot of thin and supple running line, which helps your line shoot further at the end of the cast.

The longer head of the line means your loops remain more stable in the air and you'll be able to carry more line if you have the skills to do so. It also means you need to have a fair bit of line outside the tip to get the rod to load fully, so it's not ideal for close range work, compared to most standard lines.

What's the difference between the Barrio GT90 and the GT125?

As far as I know, the GT90 and GT125 are very similar over the first 90 feet. I believe the GT125 just has extra running line at the back end, effectively making it a GT90 with an extra 35 feet of running line. I'm not an expert in fly casting, but to my untrained eye my GT125 lines seems to behave pretty much the same way as my GT90 lines.

Newer versions of the GT90 apparently have a harder coating than previous versions but I don't think the GT125 has this yet, so there's also a difference in the material used to make up the line, though it doesn't seem to make a huge amount of difference to the handling with the lines I have and my mediocre casting skills. It does feel a bit slicker, perhaps. 

You can carry a lot of line with the GT125.

Are they any good?

Few people understand fly lines better than those on the distance fly casting scene and it seems that many of the people we've met at British Fly Casting Club events seem to use the Barrio GT125, so this is probably a good a recommendation as any. 

As it's a long fly line and isn't the thinnest on the market, you will need a larger reel to house one of these lines. While nothing like as thick and spool-consuming as the Airflo 40+, you may not be able to fit the #6 line on a standard 5/6 reel and still have room for backing.

What colours are available?

The Barrio GT125 is available in any colour you like, as long as it's orange. As it's a specialist line, most are sold to distance casters and they want a brightly coloured visible line so their loops are easier to watch. By contrast, the GT90 is available in a more subdued olive.

What weights does it come in?

The GT125 comes in four weights, all of which are weight forward floating lines: WF5F, WF6F, WF7F and WF8F. If you want a bog standard weight forward floater for stillwater fly fishing, check out the GT90 instead. It's available in additional line weights and is a more practical length for everyday use.

Where can I get one?

You can only buy Barrio fly lines direct from the manufacturer, Mike Barrio. Amazingly, they're only £27.60 including free worldwide shipping, so they're superb value for money and highly recommended.

Available from: www.flylineshop.com

About the author

matt

Comments

No comments yet. Go on, be the first to comment...

Fulling Mill MasterClass Copolymer review Fulling Mill MasterClass Copolymer is the top of the range nylon copolymer tippet and...

Tacky Flydrophobic SD fly box review The Tacky Flydrophobic SD fly box is waterproof and breathable so wet flies stored in...

Airflo 2019 baseball caps review Airflo sent us three of their new 2019 baseball caps to try out. Two are trucker style...

Loop Opti fly reel review The Loop Opti fly reel is arguably one of the most desirable on the market and features...

Loop Q fly fishing kit review The Loop Q fly fishing kit is a premium fly fishing outfit including a stylish...

Loop Q fly reel review The Loop Q fly reel is a well made large arbour die-cast aluminium reel which shares...

Loop Q Series fly rod review The Loop Q Series fly rod range includes a broad range of single and double handed...

Loop Opti K2 Euro Nymph fly rod review The Loop Opti K2 Euro Nymph fly rod is aimed specifically at those who fish for...

Orvis Power Jaw Forceps review Orvis Power Jaw Forceps are tough, well made and hard-wearing and include flattened...

Get fly fishing updates

You may unsubscribe at any time. Check our privacy policy for details on how we use and protect your data.